corporate events

Art World Logistics and Jackson Pollock's "Mural"

mural.jpg

This week, the New Yorker published a piece on Jackson Pollock’s painting Mural. Since the creation of Mural in 1943, the painting’s multi-decade journey–from a Peggy Guggenheim’s home and various museums to emergency storage and world tours–illuminates many of the services that we provide as art consultants.

Commissions and Installations

As New Yorker writer Louis Menand relays, Mural was commissioned by Peggy Guggenheim, niece of Solomon R. Guggenheim of foundation and museum fame, for her Manhattan townhouse. The piece was installed by the artist and Guggenheim’s friend Marcel Duchamp–which lead to a tall tale about Duchamp slashing eight inches off the painting to make it fit in the space. The story isn’t true, but it’s a great reminder why art consultants exist: not only do we occasionally work with artists to facilitate commissions for corporate clients, but we also work with expert art handlers on installations. For each installation, we take precise measurements, use hardware that works best for the location, and protect the art and the clients’ space.

Donations

In the 1950s, Peggy Guggenheim moved to Venice and wanted to donate the painting but was faced with a conundrum. She offered the painting to Yale, but the institution passed on the donation. The painting ended up in Iowa City, eventually finding its way into the University of Iowa art museum. As art consultants, we can help facilitate the donation of art from corporate collections when the pieces are no longer a good fit for the company. Our services include finding the right home for a piece and managing the logistics of transferring ownership.

Protection and Storage

Pollock’s Mural found a great home at the University of Iowa, but decades later disaster struck. In 2008, the Iowa River flooded the campus, causing $750 million dollars in damage. The school narrowly avoided losing their art collection to the flood. According to the New York Times, “a herculean effort in the preceding days had gotten thousands of pieces, including the museum’s well-regarded collection of African art and a Jackson Pollock piece, to safety.” A component of  our work is to ensure the safety of artwork. We can work with corporate clients to properly store and protect collections from calamities like water damage, mold, pests, or theft. Storage solutions can be on-site in a corporate space or off-site through a trusted vendor.

Transportation

Ground was just broken on the new University of Iowa art museum this past June, but Mural has not been hidden from the public for the past decade. The Pollock masterpiece has been on a world tour, traveling from museum to museum while its home institution recovers. A major part of our work involves arranging the transportation of artwork. For pieces acquired in Chicago, we work with a local network of art professionals to facilitate transportation. When we acquire pieces for corporate clients from galleries in places like New York or Los Angeles, we must arrange transportation for pieces across the country. We are also experienced in facilitating the safe and timely transit of art at a global scale, navigating customs, taxes, crating, and even transAtlantic transportation.

Exhibitions

In July, Pollock’s Mural arrived at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. The piece has been in exhibitions around the world for the past ten years and, as the New Yorker notes, each museum decides how to exhibit the piece in relation to their collection. Curating and managing special exhibtions is another on of services as an art consulting firm. We work with clients to create seasonal exhibitions that showcase local artists for their employees and visitors, allowing the client to highlight their support for contemporary art or their interest in a particular medium, like photography or abstract painting. Each exhibition we curate is unique and tailored to our client and their space.

Mural is an excellent example of the interesting and varied life of a single artwork. Every work of art has a story and every owner of a piece contributes to that story. Our job is to help clients acquire new pieces or manage collections–and to help art and companies tell stories together.

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Exploring Corporate Collections

Artwork by Sam Francis and Louise Nevelson that we highlighted on a recent collection tour for a local law firm.

Artwork by Sam Francis and Louise Nevelson that we highlighted on a recent collection tour for a local law firm.

For many of our projects, we help clients acquire artwork for specific physical spaces. Size constraints and design aesthetics inform what we present and ultimately which artwork the client selects. While clients often add art to a collection one piece at a time, as art consultants we assist clients in acquiring pieces that will also fit within the context of the client’s full art collection. Whether the client has three works of art or a thousand, the dialogue and history connecting the collection is as important as the individual pieces. With every acquisition, we aim to highlight the shared DNA between art historical movements, place, and content. These threads that connect works of art in a collection can be subtle, and we delight in illuminating them.

Collection Tours

One way to learn about the connections within a collection is by attending a tour. We offer a range of tour and lecture options for client collections. These tours can be presented internally, for a client’s employees or tenants as a way to boost company pride and help team members feel connected to the artwork that they encounter every day. People love learning the stories behind the artists and can make connections between art and the company’s culture and goals.

Collection tours can also be hosted for clients and guests, giving them exclusive access to collections that are rarely publicly visible. This is a great opportunity for marketing and educating the public about a client’s investment in the art community, as well as providing a glimpse into the personality of a company. Many of our clients prioritize buying works from local artists, and hosting a lecture that connects artwork from their collection to local art history can be a deeply enriching experience.

Recently, a law firm we work with reached out about pairing a collection tour with another event. They were hosting a continuing education lecture about updates to laws affecting image licensing, which has broad applications in the art world, so hosting a collection walk-through was a natural fit. Because many of these laws are related to the year they go into effect, it was interesting to discuss how that timeline has affected contemporary works in the collection differently than works that predate the new laws. Viewing the client’s broad array of paintings, prints, and photographs set the tone for the event, and many questions after the lecture circled back to works seen during the tour. 

On tours, we love to pick out a few highlights from a collection and walk people from piece to piece, connecting the artwork with stories about the artist’s approach, influences, and style. Learning about the story behind the work makes art more accessible, and ultimately more enjoyable. In a corporate setting, this dialogue can be tailored to enhance company values and to help employees and guests foster a personal connection to a large organization. 

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Two Years & Counting

Elvis Two Times by Andy Warhol

Elvis Two Times by Andy Warhol

I've long been fascinated with the idea of twinning. As a child I paired things together into grand collections, making an ark of my belongings. Many years later in an art history graduate course, I was asked by my teacher to bring something to class that represented duality. The next day I came toting my Elvis Presley rubber stamp. The king was a twin in real life, but this trinket also carried a double meaning: allowing for endless impressions of his likeness, each similar but not exactly the same.

Last week marked the second year of our business and with it came a timely reminder that even things that appear identical are often full of nuances that make them empirically different. Our first year felt fresh and exhilarating, with nowhere to go but up. We were charged with the firsts of everything: clients, contracts, cold calls, and even robocalls were a delight as it was all brand new. During this time we built an incredible stable of corporate and private clients; we grew as a company and as individuals. We seamlessly supported our clients with elite vendors in the business of art handling, conservation, and framing through varied art-related circumstances. 

It is only in the second year, however, that comparisons could fairly to be made. Year two was steady and strong, with lessons along the way. We found a natural ebb and flow, learning more about the many challenges that face ourselves and our clients. The most exciting part of this second year has truly been facing these hurtles and finding their solutions. At the core of art consulting, is a quest for solutions -- often artful and inspiring, but at times a matter of logistics or simple perseverance. 

In this past year I traveled to the Netherlands to get inspired by their grand art institutions and shared my findings through our social media platforms. The company traveled to Colorado to hang art in a newly renovated lobby. These trips to the area allowed us to connect with Denver’s local art community. We also brought New York to Chicago, by coordinating a pop-up show in one of our rotating exhibitions. In town, we facilitated an artwork showcase for an important business conference and helped companies with their construction project logistics: moving, storing and reinstalling artwork. These are just a few of the many jobs that are bolstered by our many experiences connecting with artists at their studios and attending gallery openings.

These years have hardly been identical, but our team looks forward to making our mark again and again. Each additional year of art advising will hopefully bring with it a new series of fine art challenges and triumphs. I often remark on how great it is that no two days are the same in this line of work, but it doesn't keep me from gathering them up in my mind and cataloging what we learned for future use. A collector at heart, I’ve learned more is better when it comes to both art and experience.

It is with tremendous gratitude that we enter our third year, knowing we couldn't have done it without our surrounding community. We hope to continue to support local artists and galleries as we grow together, finding creative solutions for corporations that nourish all those involved. We will come armed with our tools and our lessons learned, ready to handle all your art related requests with meter and care because in the words of his royal highness, “Wise men say only fools rush in.”

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Organizing Artwork for Corporate Events

Easel for Display at Conference

We help our clients coordinate art-related logistics for a range of corporate events including conferences, meetings, and lectures. In a recent project, we asked to prepare a set of historical displays for a board meetings being held in several elite Chicago hotels.

Our role in this project focused on managing the art related aspects of their event and included a variety of logistical details to consider. We organized the shipment of framed historical images and text to showcase during the meeting. The panels were shipped to our warehouse, where we unpacked, inspected, and documented each item, and organized them based on their content. This location provides a safe, insured area to hold materials ahead of time. In advance of the meetings, our team of art handlers managed the careful wrapping and transportation of the panels to the event sites.

Working with Local Vendors

We collaborated with a local event rental company to source contemporary, high-quality easels to showcase the historical panels. Using easels provided an efficient option for temporary display that would be flexible based on the layout of the event whilst showcasing the integrity of each piece. The event setting was elegant and included metallic glass features, which guided our selection of easels that complimented the hotel’s décor.

In advance of setting up the displays, we worked with local handlers to schedule pick-ups and deliveries to the event location. We coordinated with event staff to ensure that proper insurance was in place and that the delivery vehicles were compliant with the requirements of the event space.

Once on site, we arranged the layout of the easels based on the flow of traffic; we wanted the panels to be in convenient locations for ease of reading by guests. An internal curator was there as well, and together we selected the panels with content that would be most relevant to the attendees. One selection showcased international branches and emphasized the company’s global influence, while another depicted industry innovations spearheaded by the company throughout its history.

Langham Hotel Chicago

The Value of Visual Details

The inclusion of these panels highlighted various company achievements and provided historical context to the discussions being held during the board meeting. Attendees could learn about the company’s many important accomplishments and innovations in their industry while discussing their future direction and goals.

The information and historical photography on the panels highlighted our client's corporate lineage and were a clear source of pride for those attending the meeting. The metallic detailing on the easels connected to the opulent design of the hotel and made the display cohesive and sharp.  By presenting the panels in a mindful, artful manner, the display provided an insightful backdrop for a productive board meeting.

Connecting to Corporate Identity

An important part of corporate art advising and art consulting is connecting our clients’ visual culture with their corporate identity. Fine art collections are a reflection of the collector’s values and function similarly to the way a company’s branding communicates the personality and goals of that entity. Understanding the visual language of our clients is at the core of our job, and we work with them to implement cohesive visual design that complements their vision. Displays for corporate events are one such opportunity to showcase a company’s history and what they stand for.

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