fine art logistics

Handling Artwork During Construction

Whenever you are renovating or undertaking construction projects in a home or office, it is important to have a plan for protecting your artwork. We assist clients with managing artwork relocation at any scale and there are a number of considerations to keep in mind when planning changes to your space.

When to Remove Art

Making structural changes to your space? Make sure to remove artwork before starting construction.

Making structural changes to your space? Make sure to remove artwork before starting construction.

In any environment, renovations can be messy and pose risks to artwork. Any scale of renovation will create dust, a common culprit in artwork damage. Drywall dust contains abrasive particles, including fiberglass, which creates scratches or blurring on the surface of plexiglass, a common material used in archival framing. Because these dust particles often spread a large distance during construction, our rule of thumb is to remove all the artwork on the renovated floor when possible. Best practice is to take the artwork off the wall before construction begins.

We work with a team of professional art handlers to review the construction area and remove all artwork that could be affected. When removing artwork we carefully document each piece of art, noting its size, condition, and any inventory or asset number associated with it. This helps us strategically plan how best to reinstall the artwork once the space is fully renovated.

We carefully wrap all of the artwork and relocate it elsewhere onsite, or transport the artwork to a secure art storage facility.

Reinstalling Artwork

Supervising an art installation

Supervising an art installation

Executing a construction project to completion is complicated, and as the process ends numerous questions arise. We are often asked when artwork should be brought back to the space. To help clients navigate these final stages, there are a few key considerations when deciding a timeline for reinstallation. First, you should ensure that all electrical work is completed before art returns to a space. Lights must be installed and operable, and no wiring should be loose. If the ceiling is open, or if wires aren’t fully integrated into the wall, the space is not yet safe for artwork.

Next, all walls must be fully completed, sealed, and painted before reinstalling artwork. This ensures that the source of dust is eliminated and that the artwork is safe from scratches or paint drips. Best practice is to remove artwork for any amount of painting, even touch-ups.

The final phase before a space is ready for artwork is installing or reinstalling furniture and large appliances. In both commercial and residential spaces, moving furniture can easily scratch, bump, or knock over artwork in its path. Mistakes happen, even with the most diligent of movers. Artwork should be the last thing that moves into a space before people occupy it. It’s the final touch of color, texture, and personality that completes a newly-renovated or constructed space. By waiting to install artwork last, you are protecting your investment and the aesthetic of the new space.

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Have Art, Will Travel

The site of a recent project in Denver, CO

The site of a recent project in Denver, CO

While many of our clients are headquartered in downtown Chicago, we work on projects throughout the region and country. Corporate art advising often involves large-scale logistics management between offices; many art collections are spread out between numerous offices and storage locations, so we manage artwork movements on our clients’ behalf.

All Our Services, in Any Location

We provide all of our fine art services in any location requested. Because we operate a primarily paperless office, we can work on-the-go with remote access to our project materials. The key components of our projects are managed on digital platforms, including collection inventories, exhibition design, and artwork installation strategy. This gives us the flexibility to manage and update projects while travelling wherever our clients need us.

In a few recent projects, we inventoried 700 artworks in a law firm’s in New York City office; installed a 500-piece collection in Washington, D.C.; sourced historical materials from corporate archives in Seattle, Los Angeles, and St Louis; and organized a rotating artwork exhibition in a Denver skyscraper.

Suburbs, Small Towns, and Cities

We are keen to travel for projects of various scales. We regularly install and relocate artwork for clients with suburban branches in the Midwest: throughout Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, and Ohio. Our team of art handlers travels with us for Midwestern projects and can provide exclusive-use shipping options for the artwork.

As well as offices, we visit client storage spaces to recommend options for installation. Corporate collections are often full of surprising artworks that can be forgotten in storage. It’s fascinating to comb through stored artwork and archives and find items that will be a great fit for a new space. During this type of project we also make recommendations about work that may need a new frame or conservation. We've recently travelled to Columbus, OH to reinstall artwork in a renovated office; transported artwork from storage in Chicago to Ann Arbor, MI, where we selected and installed art that complemented a newly-implemented design program; and acquired, framed, and shipped artwork for an office in Des Moines, IA.

When on the road for work, we take advantage of the opportunity to see fine art institutions that are otherwise too far for a casual visit. We love meeting with galleries that serve similar communities and learning about local artists that exhibit there.

Site Visits

For multi-phase projects, we prefer to schedule a site visit to learn more about the location. Areas of new construction can change dramatically from the initial floor plans we receive, and it's better to understand which artworks will be most impactful by visiting a space in person. This also gives us a chance to strategize with local project managers, see how the design strategy is implemented, and learn about local artists, galleries, and institutions. 

Working with the Local Art Community

We work with elite professionals across the country and make it a priority to support local art communities wherever we work. During our site visits we schedule meetings with prominent galleries and institutions to learn about notable local artists and fine art movements that are important to that area. Every region has its own distinct history and fine art traditions. When we highlight artwork unique to a specific community, that focus fosters a sense of pride in the people who occupy that office.  

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Two Years & Counting

Elvis Two Times by Andy Warhol

Elvis Two Times by Andy Warhol

I've long been fascinated with the idea of twinning. As a child I paired things together into grand collections, making an ark of my belongings. Many years later in an art history graduate course, I was asked by my teacher to bring something to class that represented duality. The next day I came toting my Elvis Presley rubber stamp. The king was a twin in real life, but this trinket also carried a double meaning: allowing for endless impressions of his likeness, each similar but not exactly the same.

Last week marked the second year of our business and with it came a timely reminder that even things that appear identical are often full of nuances that make them empirically different. Our first year felt fresh and exhilarating, with nowhere to go but up. We were charged with the firsts of everything: clients, contracts, cold calls, and even robocalls were a delight as it was all brand new. During this time we built an incredible stable of corporate and private clients; we grew as a company and as individuals. We seamlessly supported our clients with elite vendors in the business of art handling, conservation, and framing through varied art-related circumstances. 

It is only in the second year, however, that comparisons could fairly to be made. Year two was steady and strong, with lessons along the way. We found a natural ebb and flow, learning more about the many challenges that face ourselves and our clients. The most exciting part of this second year has truly been facing these hurtles and finding their solutions. At the core of art consulting, is a quest for solutions -- often artful and inspiring, but at times a matter of logistics or simple perseverance. 

In this past year I traveled to the Netherlands to get inspired by their grand art institutions and shared my findings through our social media platforms. The company traveled to Colorado to hang art in a newly renovated lobby. These trips to the area allowed us to connect with Denver’s local art community. We also brought New York to Chicago, by coordinating a pop-up show in one of our rotating exhibitions. In town, we facilitated an artwork showcase for an important business conference and helped companies with their construction project logistics: moving, storing and reinstalling artwork. These are just a few of the many jobs that are bolstered by our many experiences connecting with artists at their studios and attending gallery openings.

These years have hardly been identical, but our team looks forward to making our mark again and again. Each additional year of art advising will hopefully bring with it a new series of fine art challenges and triumphs. I often remark on how great it is that no two days are the same in this line of work, but it doesn't keep me from gathering them up in my mind and cataloging what we learned for future use. A collector at heart, I’ve learned more is better when it comes to both art and experience.

It is with tremendous gratitude that we enter our third year, knowing we couldn't have done it without our surrounding community. We hope to continue to support local artists and galleries as we grow together, finding creative solutions for corporations that nourish all those involved. We will come armed with our tools and our lessons learned, ready to handle all your art related requests with meter and care because in the words of his royal highness, “Wise men say only fools rush in.”

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Fine Art Shipping & Transportation

CUSTOM CRATE FOR SHIPPING

DeGroot Fine Art consults on corporate and private art collections across the country, and we often transport artwork from galleries to framers to offices. Depending on the project we use long-distance art shuttles, local transportation, and exclusive-use trucks driven by dedicated staff. Each artwork shipment method is customized to fit our client’s timeline and artwork is packed with the utmost care and security.

Packing

Every artwork has specific considerations to best protect it during transportation. For delicate artwork like glass sculptures or works with small components, we fabricate custom crates that are designed to support and protect the most vulnerable artwork. For all packing methods, we use archival materials that protect the chemical balance of paintings, works on paper, and sculptural surfaces and are compliant with museum standards. Our white-glove treatment is designed to protect artwork at every step of the shipment, ensuring a safe and efficient delivery.

Local Transportation

If your office is moving within the same area, inclusive art handling and local transportation makes relocating your art collection a breeze. Our handlers will pack artwork securely onsite, transport your art collection to its new location, and reinstall the artwork in a timely manner. We use internal inventory systems to account for every work of art and design installation plans in advance so the move is efficient and hassle-free.

We regularly use art handlers for local shipping to and from frame shops, conservation studios, and display fabricators. Our professional fine art handlers coordinate the logistics on both ends of the delivery to ensure a convenient schedule for all parties involved. They work with galleries and private collectors as well to transport artwork wherever it’s needed.

Long Distance Fine Art Shuttles

Long distance shuttles are a great option for transporting artwork between cities, especially if the timeline is flexible. We work with a network of shuttles across the country and can have artwork picked up by professional art handlers from any corporate location. For delicate artwork and sculptures, we use air-ride trucks to ensure a smooth ride, with custom packing that will protect the artwork during shipment. Depending on archival considerations, trucks with temperature and humidity control are available as well.

Exclusive Use Transportation

When a large shipment of artwork is required, we hire professionally trained art handlers to drive exclusive-use trucks across the country. The handlers carefully wrap the individual artworks, pack them securely into the truck, and can deliver them to any destination in the continental United States. Trucks can be used for projects on a local, regional, or national nexus with flexible schedules to suit the specific conditions of a project. These shipments are dictated by the client’s schedule, and are an excellent option for time-sensitive projects.

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