art handling

Meet Our New Team Member: Brontë Mansfield

Brontë Mansfield.jpeg

At the start of the New Year, Brontë joined the DeGroot Fine Art team as a Project Assistant, focusing on marketing for new projects. Here’s how Brontë came to the art world and our company:

In 2010, Chinese conceptual artist Ai Weiwei unveiled a new installation at Tate Modern in London. The installation, Kui Hua Zi, spread 100 million porcelain sunflower seeds over the floor of a single gallery. Each seed–every one of the hundred million–was shaped, fired, and painted by hand. It took over a thousand workers in a Chinese town more than two years to produce all of the seeds.

And there I was, 17 years old and standing in front of all of those seeds, the first time I set foot in an art museum. If I had scooped up a hundred of the porcelain seeds in my hands, I would have held more seeds than there were people in my hometown in rural Wisconsin. Another handful and that would probably be more than all of the people I had met in my life.

After years of cornfields and football, I did not know what to do with myself in a bustling foreign city. But then I found subways, coffee shops, bookstores, and–mostly importantly–all of the free art museums in the city. Even at seventeen, I knew I wanted to spend the rest of my life around art.

I returned to the states to go to college at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. As a freshman, I was hired as an assistant to the Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Chazen Museum of Art. One of my first days at the museum, I was tasked with helping reframe a six-foot-long ink drawing by another famed Chinese artist, Xu Bing. I am proud to say that I didn't buckle under the high pressure and have been professionally handling art ever since.

During my time at University of Wisconsin-Madison, I specialized in Victorian art history and literature, writing my thesis on nineteenth-century paintings of mermaids and Darwinian theories of evolution–but also wrote for the school newspaper and worked as an editor at the campus magazine. In 2014, I was awarded a Beinecke Scholarship to study at the graduate school of my choice. I decided to leave academia and pursue journalism, to help share stories of art and culture to as many people as I could.

In 2017, I received my Masters in New Arts Journalism from School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC). During graduate school, I worked in the school's Marketing & Communications department and was also asked to assistant teach a class on contemporary art history. Even though the art I knew best was made before the Titanic sank, I threw myself into the world of modern and contemporary art–and even started working as a studio manager for a Chicago-based artist.

During graduate school, I focused on audio production and storytelling. In addition to my work as a freelance audio producer, I have worked as a production & recording assistant for the Art Institute of Chicago and recently joined the faculty at School of the Art Institute of Chicago, teaching podcasting and video essays.

I am thrilled to be able to merge my background in both fine art and journalism in my new role as Project Assistant at DeGroot Fine Art. I look forward to sharing more stories from the world of art consulting with our clients and anyone interested in collecting, preserving, and supporting fine art.

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All About Printmaking

The art of printmaking is comprised of a variety of techniques and materials and has ancient roots in many cultures. A discipline central to the history of art as well as contemporary art, we encounter fine art prints in many--if not most--of our clients' corporate and private collections, and we often get questions about the types, care and terminology surrounding the field of printmaking. While printmaking is an incredibly historic, diverse and deep field of study that can't be summarized in one blog post, here are some responses and resources addressing just a few of the questions we receive the most. 

What is a print? 

The Tate Modern website defines a print as "...an impression made by any method involving transfer from one surface to another." The image is created when ink is transferred onto paper, cloth, or another surface using one of a variety of materials and methods. A printed impression can be unique (monoprint/ monotype) or part of a limited edition of prints. 

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/p/print

What types of prints are there? 

Printmakers use many techniques and often combine techniques to achieve their desired impression. The most common types of printing techniques we encounter are Lithography, Intaglio, Relief, Screenprinting and Digital printing. Within these broad categories are a plethora of techniques and materials. 

You can find some great explanations and examples of different printmaking techniques here: http://www.paceprints.com/techniques

Is a print a reproduction or an original work of art?

Fine art prints are original works of art created using methods and techniques of printmaking. A limited edition results from an artist using the same plate or block to create multiple identical impressions of the same image, and each impression is recorded with an edition number.  

A print is not a reproduction of an existing painting or drawing. 

How should I display or store my print? 

Because many prints are printed with ink on paper, great care should be taken in storing and displaying prints. To prevent common conservation issues such as paper deterioration, discoloration, buckling and fading, prints should always be stored and displayed in archival, acid-free materials, with protection from excess humidity and ultraviolet light. Learn more about our recommendations for storing and displaying artwork here.

What do the numbers and markings on my print mean?

Along with signing and titling their prints, artists mark their prints in pencil with an edition number. Prints are labeled with the impression number and a slash indicating the total number of prints in the edition (ie. 5/10). There are other markings designating the type of impression in an edition, such as A/P (Artist's Proof), B.A.T (Bon a Tirer) or T/P (Trial Proof).

Here is a helpful link explaining different conventions artists use to label a print as well as common printmaking terminology. https://www.nga.gov/gemini/glossary.htm

Happy collecting! 

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Two Years & Counting

Elvis Two Times by Andy Warhol

Elvis Two Times by Andy Warhol

I've long been fascinated with the idea of twinning. As a child I paired things together into grand collections, making an ark of my belongings. Many years later in an art history graduate course, I was asked by my teacher to bring something to class that represented duality. The next day I came toting my Elvis Presley rubber stamp. The king was a twin in real life, but this trinket also carried a double meaning: allowing for endless impressions of his likeness, each similar but not exactly the same.

Last week marked the second year of our business and with it came a timely reminder that even things that appear identical are often full of nuances that make them empirically different. Our first year felt fresh and exhilarating, with nowhere to go but up. We were charged with the firsts of everything: clients, contracts, cold calls, and even robocalls were a delight as it was all brand new. During this time we built an incredible stable of corporate and private clients; we grew as a company and as individuals. We seamlessly supported our clients with elite vendors in the business of art handling, conservation, and framing through varied art-related circumstances. 

It is only in the second year, however, that comparisons could fairly to be made. Year two was steady and strong, with lessons along the way. We found a natural ebb and flow, learning more about the many challenges that face ourselves and our clients. The most exciting part of this second year has truly been facing these hurtles and finding their solutions. At the core of art consulting, is a quest for solutions -- often artful and inspiring, but at times a matter of logistics or simple perseverance. 

In this past year I traveled to the Netherlands to get inspired by their grand art institutions and shared my findings through our social media platforms. The company traveled to Colorado to hang art in a newly renovated lobby. These trips to the area allowed us to connect with Denver’s local art community. We also brought New York to Chicago, by coordinating a pop-up show in one of our rotating exhibitions. In town, we facilitated an artwork showcase for an important business conference and helped companies with their construction project logistics: moving, storing and reinstalling artwork. These are just a few of the many jobs that are bolstered by our many experiences connecting with artists at their studios and attending gallery openings.

These years have hardly been identical, but our team looks forward to making our mark again and again. Each additional year of art advising will hopefully bring with it a new series of fine art challenges and triumphs. I often remark on how great it is that no two days are the same in this line of work, but it doesn't keep me from gathering them up in my mind and cataloging what we learned for future use. A collector at heart, I’ve learned more is better when it comes to both art and experience.

It is with tremendous gratitude that we enter our third year, knowing we couldn't have done it without our surrounding community. We hope to continue to support local artists and galleries as we grow together, finding creative solutions for corporations that nourish all those involved. We will come armed with our tools and our lessons learned, ready to handle all your art related requests with meter and care because in the words of his royal highness, “Wise men say only fools rush in.”

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Fine Art Shipping & Transportation

CUSTOM CRATE FOR SHIPPING

DeGroot Fine Art consults on corporate and private art collections across the country, and we often transport artwork from galleries to framers to offices. Depending on the project we use long-distance art shuttles, local transportation, and exclusive-use trucks driven by dedicated staff. Each artwork shipment method is customized to fit our client’s timeline and artwork is packed with the utmost care and security.

Packing

Every artwork has specific considerations to best protect it during transportation. For delicate artwork like glass sculptures or works with small components, we fabricate custom crates that are designed to support and protect the most vulnerable artwork. For all packing methods, we use archival materials that protect the chemical balance of paintings, works on paper, and sculptural surfaces and are compliant with museum standards. Our white-glove treatment is designed to protect artwork at every step of the shipment, ensuring a safe and efficient delivery.

Local Transportation

If your office is moving within the same area, inclusive art handling and local transportation makes relocating your art collection a breeze. Our handlers will pack artwork securely onsite, transport your art collection to its new location, and reinstall the artwork in a timely manner. We use internal inventory systems to account for every work of art and design installation plans in advance so the move is efficient and hassle-free.

We regularly use art handlers for local shipping to and from frame shops, conservation studios, and display fabricators. Our professional fine art handlers coordinate the logistics on both ends of the delivery to ensure a convenient schedule for all parties involved. They work with galleries and private collectors as well to transport artwork wherever it’s needed.

Long Distance Fine Art Shuttles

Long distance shuttles are a great option for transporting artwork between cities, especially if the timeline is flexible. We work with a network of shuttles across the country and can have artwork picked up by professional art handlers from any corporate location. For delicate artwork and sculptures, we use air-ride trucks to ensure a smooth ride, with custom packing that will protect the artwork during shipment. Depending on archival considerations, trucks with temperature and humidity control are available as well.

Exclusive Use Transportation

When a large shipment of artwork is required, we hire professionally trained art handlers to drive exclusive-use trucks across the country. The handlers carefully wrap the individual artworks, pack them securely into the truck, and can deliver them to any destination in the continental United States. Trucks can be used for projects on a local, regional, or national nexus with flexible schedules to suit the specific conditions of a project. These shipments are dictated by the client’s schedule, and are an excellent option for time-sensitive projects.

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