Art & Business, In Collaboration

 Pablo Picasso painting at La Colombe d'Or

Pablo Picasso painting at La Colombe d'Or

As corporate art consultants, we have the unique opportunity to facilitate relationships between business entities and art communities. Both worlds benefit from a positive relationship; artists gain exposure and financial security through selling their work to corporations, who in turn grow their financial capital and visual identity through their artwork investments.

It’s very rewarding to see examples of art collecting as a fruitful business practice, so during a recent trip to France I made sure to stop by the hotel and restaurant, La Colombe d'Or. Located in the Cote d'Azur hilltop town of Saint Paul de Vence, this establishment has long been known for its symbiotic relationship with artists.

After the hotel opened in 1931, it quickly became a popular destination for artists driven south by World War I. The owner took note of his creative customers and struck up friendships with many of the artists and actors who passed through. An art lover himself, the owner recognized the potential value in artwork and offered many artists free lodging in exchange for paintings.

 Alexander Calder sculpture at La Colombe d'Or

Alexander Calder sculpture at La Colombe d'Or

This generous gesture worked in his favor; he grew prosperous relationships with a community of artists and the artwork he was gifted grew tremendously in value. The impressive collection fills the walls of the hotel: the dining room hang paintings gifted by Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, and Marc Chagall. Outside, a large, free-standing mobile by Alexander Calder is perched beside the pool next to a mosaic by George Braque. Hotel ownership has stayed in the same family for three generations, with a continued commitment to art collecting and patronage that persists today.

It was striking to see iconic Modern artworks in such an intimate setting. Outside of the traditional museum setting, the artwork contributed to a welcoming, historic atmosphere. It was a great example of how building an art collection is a positive business practice which nourishes the cultural interests of all parties involved long-term.

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